Gleanings From Learning in Spite of Labels by Joyce Herzog - 1





I have begun to read Joyce Herzog’s book – the second edition came out in 1994. While it may seem “old school,” I like the title. We hear much about labels. Sometimes parents choose to get diagnoses for good reasons. However, in many ways, labels DO NOT HELP the child reach his FULL GOD-GIVEN POTENTIAL.


About the Author on the back cover: “Joyce Herzog began tutoring in the second grade. She has been teaching the learning disabled and their teachers for twenty-five years in public and private schools and homeschooling situations (reviewer’s note: as of 1994). She has a master’s degree in Learning Disabilities from the University of Iowa, and a Ph.D. in Humane Letters from Jacksonville Theological Seminary.”


Her work is featured on this website:

Ability Based Learning, home to Scaredy Cat Reading System


Gleanings


  • Sharon Grimes’ foreword reminds us that when we think of the needs of our children the most important degree is M.A.M.A. not the M.A. (p. vi)

  • Sharon Grimes concludes her forward with, “Don’t ever forget that God has a very special plan for your child, and that, by His grace, and with Joyce’s helpful advice in this book, your child can LEARN in spite of Labels!” (p. vii)

  • Herzog dislikes many of the labels used with children. Many children are put in an academic environment before they are ready. We often cause disabilities in this way. Further we are all “disabled” in some ways. (p. ix)

  • Herzog concludes this part of her preface with, “No matter what labels have been put on your child, he was created to learn. Let’s concentrate on our “ables”, not our labels!” (p.x)

  • Understanding the difference between TEACHING and LEARNING provides a great foundation to Herzog’s message in this book. (p. xi)

  • “True teaching is facilitating learning…” not just “presenting information. Often, we present information and move on before a child has mastered the information. (p. xi)

  • Learning happens best when we work one-on-one and teach “children” not “subjects.” (p.xii)


We will continue gathering gleanings from Joyce Herzog’s book as I continue my read.